Wounded Knee

Wounded Knee

In 1890, a firefight broke out on the Wounded Knee creek (“Wounded knee”) when the US Army attempted to disarm the Lakota tribe. During the battle, killing 25 soldiers and 153 Indians, including men, women and children. According to some sources, the number of Indians killed reaches 300 people. For this battle, at least 20 regimental servicemen are awarded the highest US military award - the Medal of Honor.40

For the Indians, Wounded Knee is a special place. On February 27, 1973, the Wounded Knee settlement captured from 200 to 300 Indians. They take over the command of the village, declaring that they maintain traditional tribal rule in it. The village is declared an independent Indian state - a territory free from pale faces. “The government has two choices,” say the rebels, “either to attack and destroy us, as it was in 1890, or to consider our moderate demands.”

The Indians take eleven residents hostage, barricade themselves in churches and dig trenches on the hill. Their requirements are: verification of all contracts between the US government and the Indians (371 contracts), removal from office of corrupt tribal council members, and changes in tribal legislation.

The next morning, more than 100 American police blocked off all roads to Wounded Knee.First, two senators fly to the place of unrest, negotiate with the rebels and learn with surprise that the hostages are cooperating with the rebels and can leave the village at any time.

Only the attention of the press saves the Indians from an immediate assault (the action takes place during the struggle of black Americans for civil rights) and the presence of William Kunstler, a famous defender, his clients included Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Stokeley Carmichael, Bobby Seale.41

 

What is initially thought of as a symbolic confrontation, which was supposed to draw the attention of the government to the situation of Native Americans, results in a two-month armed conflict on American territory, the longest since the civil war in the United States, in which the “invaders” exchange fire with police, FBI agents , military advisors and tribe police.

The units of the National Guard and the FBI pulled up to Wounded Knee are beginning to attempt to assault the heights, however, realizing the hopelessness of victory with “little blood” or without using heavy weapons, the authorities resort to blockade and shelling from small arms, including large-caliber machine guns.As a result of shelling, the local church was burned first, and then destroyed to the ground. The walls of all houses in the village were riddled with bullets, including huge holes from heavy machine gun shots.AIM militants at their checkpoint on the road leading into the Wounded Knee 1973.

 

The confrontation continues, the calls for the surrender of weapons, the Indians refuse, the negotiators are transferred only the bodies of those killed and seriously wounded in battles. The uprising ends on the 71st day of the siege, the number of wounded is 50 killed 6. The Indians did not “lay down their arms and surrender”; they came out to meet the enemies only after the government promised to fulfill all their demands until independence. They came under the guarantee of complete immunity and with arms in their hands. The fact that the authorities did not dare to delay at least one participant in the uprising spoke about how frightened they were by the possibility of an uprising on reservations. And although then there was a court, the participants in the uprising came there without a convoy, being sure that they were right. And in court they won.

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  • Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

    Wounded Knee

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